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Description: A bullfight in Spain in the 1940s with the famous bullfighter Manolete

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Clip #: TFA-100A
Length: 11:53
Year: 1948
Color: Color
Sound: Silent
Library: TFA Network
Decade: 1940s
Filmmaker: Andre de la Varre
Region: Europe
Country: Spain
Subject: Sports
Original: 16mm
bullfighting, spain, picadors, bullring, red cape, matador, arena, crowds, audience, bull, clapping, cheering, smoking cigar, procession of matadors, Manolete, man opens door to let bull into ring, horses drag dead bull across ring, more bullfighting, crowd claps, clapping, matador stabs bull with sword, bull dies,

Manuel Laureano Rodríguez Sánchez (July 4, 1917 in Córdoba, Spain – August 28, 1947 in Linares, Spain), better known as Manolete, was a famous Spanish bullfighter. He rose to prominence shortly after the Spanish Civil War and is considered by some to be the greatest bullfighter of all time. His style was sober and serious, with few concessions to the gallery, and he excelled at the 'suerte de matar'—the kill. Manolete's contribution to bullfighting included being able to stand very still while passing the bull close to his body and, rather than giving the passes separately, he was able to remain in one spot and link four or five consecutive passes together into compact series. He popularized a pass with the red cloth called the "Manoletina" which is normally given just before entering to kill with the sword. In addition to all of the major bullrings of Spain, he had very important triumphs in Plaza Mexico. He died following a goring in the right upper leg as he killed the fifth bull of the day, the Miura bull Islero, an event that left Spain in a state of shock. Manolete received his fatal goring in the town of Linares where he appeared alongside the up-and-coming matador Luis Miguel Dominguín, who, after Manolete's death, proclaimed himself to be number one. In response to Manolete's death, General Francisco Franco, then ruler of Spain, ordered three days of "national mourning", during which only funeral dirges were heard on the radio.

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