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African Pigmy Thrills
Description: Shows pigmy tribe building a bridge over a river.

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Clip #: TFA-79C
Length: 9:33
Color: B/W
Sound: Sound
Library: TFA Network
Decade: 1930s
Filmmaker: Armand Denis
Region: Africa
Subject: Native Life
Original: 16mm
puff adder, jungle, rain forest, pigmy group, carving and eating raw elepahnt meat, drumming and dancing, crocodiles, building a bridge, collecting vines and pieces of wood, man climbs tall tree, chief, making a swing to carry vines across river, climbing wood ladder, pigmys with bow and arrows, carrying vines across river, weaving vines,

A pygmy is a member of any human group whose adult males grow to less than 4 feet 11 inches in average height A member of a slightly taller group is termed pygmoid. The best known pygmies are the Aka, Efé and Mbuti of central Africa. There are also pygmies in Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Brazil and Bolivia. The Negritos were the earliest inhabitants of Southeast Asia. The remains of at least 25 miniature humans, who lived between 1,000 and 3,000 years ago, were found on the islands of Palau in Micronesia. The term "pygmy" is often considered degrading. However, there is no single term to replace it that covers all African pygmies. Many so called pygmies prefer instead to be referred to by the name of their various ethnic groups, or names for various interrelated groups such as the Aka (Mbenga), Baka, Mbuti, and Twa. The term Bayaka, the plural form of the Aka/Yaka, is sometimes used in the Central African Republic to refer to all local Pygmies. Likewise, the Kongo word Bambenga is used in Congo.

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