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Deutsche Gronland-Expedition Alfred Wegener
Description: A film of German expedition to Greenland in 1930

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Clip #: TFA-64A
Length: 15:34
Year: 1930
Color: B/W
Sound: Silent
Library: TFA Network
Decade: 1930s
Region: Europe
Country: Russia
Subject: Explorers
Original: 16mm
snow, ice, Greenland, explorers, snow tractors, snowcats, Alfred Wegener, sled, backpack, snow covered mountains, ice picks chopping ice, crevasse, portage, supplies, expedition, mountain climbing, ponies with packs, propeller driven ski tractor, dogsleds, eskimos, inuit, distance wheel, setting up camp, feeding dogs,

Alfred Wegener had early training in astronomy (Ph.D., University of Berlin, 1904). He became very interested in the new discipline of meteorology (he married the daughter of famous meteorologist and climatologist Wladimir Köppen) and as a record-holding balloonist himself, pioneered the use of weather balloons to track air masses. His lectures became a standard textbook in meteorology, The Thermodynamics of the Atmosphere. Wegener was part of several expeditions to Greenland to study polar air circulation, when the existence of a jet stream itself was highly controversial. On his last expedition, Alfred Wegener and his companion Rasmus Villumsen went missing in November 1930. Wegener's body was found on May 12, 1931. His suspected cause of death was heart failure through overexertion.

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