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The Russian Riviera
Description: A tour of the Russian Riviera in the Crimea in the 1930s

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Clip #: TFA-40G
Length: 2:07
Color: B/W
Sound: Sound
Library: TFA Network
Decade: 1940s
Region: Europe
Country: Russia
City: Yalta
Original: 16mm
Keywords:
THE RUSSIAN RIVIERA: Crimean coast, Sochi, Black Sea, Tzar summer palace, sunbathing workers, resort dining hall, man eating soup, Yalta.

Notes:
During the 20th century Yalta was the principal holiday resort of the Soviet Union. In 1920, Lenin issued a decree "On the Use of Crimea for the Medical Treatment of the Working People" which endorsed the region's transformation from a fairly exclusive resort area into a recreation facility for tired proletarians. Numerous workers' sanatoria were constructed in and around Yalta. There were, in fact, few other places that Soviet citizens could come for a seaside holiday, as foreign travel was forbidden to all but a handful. The Soviet elite also came to Yalta; the Soviet dictator Stalin used the Massandra Palace as his summer residence. NKVD shot all prisoners in city prisons on November 4, 1941. The town came to worldwide attention in 1945 when the Yalta Conference between the "Big Three" powers; the Soviet Union, the United States and the United Kingdom was held at the Livadia Palace.


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